• WebLogic is a J2EE server and as such provides support for J2EE API’s including.
      • JDBC
      • JTA
      • EJB
      • RMI over IIOP
      • Servlets
      • JSP
      • JNDI
      • JMS
      • WebLogic defines a number of concepts so before we get rolling we should investigate what WebLogic server physically is.
      • When you installed WLS you choose a directory to put it in, we will call this the <install directory>
      • The Files and the files and folders created by the install includes tools to start, stop, and administrate your WLS installation.
      • WLS version 6 runs on and ships with Java version 1.3, the install includes JDK 1.3.0 in <install directory>\jdk130
      • Thankfully we won’t cover every detail about WLS and how it is configure and how to set up every option.
      • We will focus on getting enough information about WLS so you can successfully setup a WLS server.
      • We will get started on monitoring your WLS configuration, so you can trouble shoot.
      • We will look at some configuration options and get more comfortable configuring WLS.
      • When you install WebLogic Server it comes with all the tools you need to visually configure and monitor your J2EE server. Start me up
      • There are several ways to startup a WLS server.
      • In windows you can use the Start menu. Start > Programs > BEA … > BEA WebLogic Server > Start Default Server
      • You can start the Server from the command line using a predefined script. Navigate to your domain under the <install directory> and run the script called “startWebLogic”.
      • You can run WLS as a Service in Windows. To configure services open the control panel and select “services”. WebLogic Server should appear in the list.
      • You can also fire up WLS in a more direct fashion using the command line without scripts. Because of the difficulty with the command line it is common to write your own startup scripts for a server.
      • WebLogic is a Java class, and it is run in a Java Virtual machine. To start your server type in “java weblogic.Server”.
      • To successfully start the server the options to the java command must include the following.
      • -classpath
      • -Dweblogic.Name=
      • -Dweblogic.managementusername=
      • -Dweblogic.management.username=
      • There are optional parameters as well.
      • -Dweblogic.RootDirectory=
      • -Dweblogic.RootDirectory=
      • -Dweblogic.Domain=

 

    • WebLogic View
      • From a WebLogic perspective, the WebLogic Server sits as a middleman between the clients and services that are provided.
      • There are several different types of clients that can call into WebLogic.
      • Web Browsers
      • Java Applets and applications
      • Connected PDA’s and Cell Phones
      • CORBA clients
      • COM objects
      • In addition to a database (RDBMS) there are several server side or backend services that a typical application server will have to access.
      • Database
      • Legacy Systems
      • COM components
      • To provide communications between the variety of clients and server applications WLS uses several protocols.
      • HTTP is used for web communication.
      • WLS can serve as a Web Server and be used to communicate to browsers such as Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator.
      • HTTP is used for communicating to mobile devices with WAP filters.
      • HTTPS is a secure version of HTTP used to transfer more sensitive data. HTTPS uses a Secure Socket Layer (SSL).
      • T3 is another protocol used to communicate to WebLogic.
      • T3 was defined by BEA and is used in BEA products like Tuxedo.
      • T3 has a secure version of the protocol called T3S, which uses SSL.
      • T3 can be used by applets and applications to communicate to a server without using HTTP or going through a web server.

 

  • Thread Pools
    • When a request is sent into WLS it is put in a queue with all other requests.
    • A “pool” of threads handles the tasks in the execution queue.
    • Each task placed in the queue must wait until a thread is available to process it.
    • The number of threads created in the thread pool is a big part of the customization of your WLS installation.
    • By creating many threads the requests will be handled quicker, to a point.
    • Defining too many threads in the Thread Pool will cause performance degradation as the administration and overhead of keeping track of all the threads becomes too much.
    • The default number of threads in the pool is 15; you can configure it to be between 10 and 40. (We will see how to configure soon.)
    • A quick visualization of the thread pool and task queue follows.

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